There’s so many interesting insights into human behaviour from 2020. Watch the Vlog with 3rdspace UK Head of strategy Rachael Sullivan & 3rdspace Founder Rob Logan as they explore the learnings from the pandemic and how brands can plug into the global community with local context through content marketing

There’s no doubt about it. 2020 was a very challenging year globally for humanity, which makes it a very interesting year for observing human behaviour.

The impact of the pandemic will have lasting implications on how we live and work as a global community. It will also potentially have lasting implications on consumer behaviour post covid. Here are three cultural trends we’ve been observing that look set to continue and shape consumer behaviour for the next few years.

Fear is a by far the biggest driver of human behaviour 

Sigmund Freud stated that human motivation is driven by two innate needs. To increase pleasure or reduce pain. Most marketing over the last two decades has been, consciously or not, been based on the concept of ‘toward motivation’ where people receive a benefit for buying something – a positive feeling and an enhanced experience. 

During Covid, this motivation has become far less attractive. Today it would seem that humans are only motivated by one thing – to relieve discomfort. Which talks to Freud's other human motivation. We buy products or services to avoid something or a feeling that is unpleasant to us. And 2020 was an extremely  uncomfortable year. Which poses the question: is human buying behaviour now primarily motivated to relieve discomfort? Either, hunger, boredom, cold, overheating, pain, social isolation, not feeling good enough? It seems that the acronym FOMO is far more than a social media phenomenon -  it’s human motivation personified.

Our hierarchy of needs has had a reset

The Covid-19 pandemic and subsequent global lockdowns threw our focus downwards in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. From esteem needs which have been a growing focus in the last decade,  right down the triangle to our physical and safety needs initially, setting in the middle on Love & Belonging. This seems to match early retail data with consumer spending on home renovations, accessories for the home, healthcare, food, home and family time increasing.

Resetting our focus on safety, love and belonging also sparked more honest and open conversations around psychological safety. With people being motivated by decades of discomfort - around subjects such as black lives matter, male suicide and the mental health ticking time bomb. These significant, more honest conversations will hopefully have an evolving positive impact on our industry, with marketers taking a more conscious approach to communicating from both an inclusion and mental health point of view. 

Things are far from perfect, but 2021 does feel altogether more hopeful and optimistic in Australasia. A feeling that will hopefully soon be shared in the west as the vaccination program has a positive impact on transmission. Meaning our human need state is now hovering around ‘Love and Belonging’ instead of bouncing back to esteem. Brands who are able to adapt their marketing and communications quickly to tap into shared values of love and belonging will continue to see the best customer engagement.

People are more judgemental yet less predicative

A by-product of mass global uncertainty is that humans subconsciously try to create more certainty for themselves because we confuse feeling certain with feeling safe. 

The result is we see worrying trends of people being more judgemental and divided – particularly in political spheres. As this compounds, consumer behaviour also becomes less predictable. Customers are more vocal in their judgements in periods of hyper uncertainty and less likely to be loyal as their tolerance for change increases. One campaign or tweet that doesn’t resonate and people change their views and behaviour quickly. The message for brand marketers is taking a purpose driven approach, that you can stay true to, while adapting to your customers needs in an ever changing world.

3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help. Contact rob@3rdspace.com.au

 

If 2020 made virtual events a fact of life for business, then 2021 is definitely looking like the year of the hybrid event. If you’re going the hybrid route, here’s a go-to guide for building engagement strategies into your programming and interacting in new and exciting ways.

 

Event managers are well versed in wet weather contingencies. Taking that one step further, the COVID crisis has shown us that including a virtual element in your events and conferences is an insurance policy that guarantees your event can move forward, rain hail or shine.

 

A magical mix of both physical and virtual components, hybrid events bring greater flexibility, scalability and the opportunity to adopt an always-on approach to sharing content with guests. Virtual events give your guests more ways to catch up on content and attend multiple, overlapping sessions. (Compare that to physical events where traditionally you have to choose between competing sessions.) All of this adds up to greater consumption of your content and longer view times.

 

Interactivity is everything

In this brand new world of event management, you don’t want your participants to hit the snooze (read pause) button before they’ve even made it to morning tea time. So you must create entertaining opportunities to interact. There is a multitude of cost-effective software options on the market now that make interaction between your presenters, moderators and guests possible by scanning a QR code that loads up the interface.

 

Consider incorporating small group breakout rooms where guests can brainstorm with trainers, or polls throughout where guests can vote on topics, or a feedback option at the end of a session. Think of your conference like your favourite radio show, and run hourly quizzes or simple competitions with participants.

 

Creating an awards show? Don’t forget the red carpet; maybe even incentivise your guests to log online in their best outfit. How about virtual dance-floor breaks throughout the event? Now you’re talking.

 

It all starts before it begins

Viewer interaction isn’t just something you power up on event day. Invest some hours in developing a solid communications plan that details when and how you will interact with your guests. Some items on your plan may be functional, such as a “How to get here/How to log on” emails; others could give your audience the opportunity to vote on topics they most want to hear about which in turn enables your presenters to craft their content accordingly. You could give your attendees the opportunity to ask a question ahead of time, ensuring you have a bank of content on hand in case your audience is a little shy on the day.

 

Give ‘em the old razzle dazzle

Imagine watching your favourite movie without the soundtrack, snappy editing and special effects? It just wouldn’t have the same appeal would it. Great virtual events need a little drama to hold the attention of your audience, so finding the right video creation platform is essential.

 

When creating live broadcasts for events, 3rdspace uses colourful, streamlined graphic layers, applying fully branded graphics over speakers and segments and incorporating sponsor entitlements as required. Using a sophisticated streaming platform we can play out multiple video pieces within the stream as well as static billboards – whatever we need to up the ante for our clients. With events managed by a dedicated live broadcast producer, our platform gives you the confidence to hold a hybrid event even if tech is not your forte.

 

Don’t forget your mod squad

Great moderators are worth their wait in gold. Not only can they ensure the discussion stays on track, they can also add serious personality to your chat room as they welcome your guests and interact with your them, putting them at ease and encouraging even the shyest participants to collaborate. Choose your mods wisely.

 

A virtual element is no longer a “nice-to-have” but an essential for your next event. If you plan and build simple, fun ways to interact, your virtual portion can help grow stronger, more loyal audiences who walk away with their professional love tanks full.

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3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help. Contact Kathrine Holland kathrine.h@3rdspace.com.au or 0402 209 683

 

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Rob Logan – Founder & CEO

+61 419 722 151

rob@3rdspace.com.au

 

Madeleine Lourey - Client Services Manager

+61 409 700 965

madeleine.l@3rdspace.com.au

 

 Jae Tame – Producer

+61 0401 458 350

 jae.t@3rdspace.com.au

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Susan Burchill, 3rdspace senior writer and Rachael Sullivan help you debunk the secrets to achieving cult-status for your brand.

As the world continues to change at an exponential rate, brand marketers everywhere are asking: 

How do we keep up? 

How do we stay relevant in an uncertain world?

They’re big questions and I certainly don’t have all the answers. But Tim Duggan’s latest book ‘Cult Status is a great resource to kickstart your thinking. Duggan is co-founder of Junkee Media, based in Sydney. In Cult Status he shares his seven steps for building a successful business in a post-COVID world. While the book is aimed at the next generation of entrepreneurs, the principles extend nicely to marketers wanting to think differently.

Cult Status is defined as:

A business or project with a dedicated community around it who strongly identify with its purpose.

I’m proud to say I’ve been passionate about helping brands define their purpose since before purpose was cool. Most people who know me know that Simon Sinek is my biggest professional crush. I’ve developed a process and used it successfully for years, based on the principles he teaches, helping dozens of brands articulate their purpose, from global corporations and charities to start-ups. What I like about Cult Status is, it’s got me thinking differently. It’s challenged me to re-examine the process I use to better suit the challenges brands and consumers face today. 

How can marketers and leaders create cult status?

During the pandemic Duggan noticed a trend emerging: “...the more cult status a business had, the better its ability to survive through the tough times,” he says.

Not surprisingly Duggan’s first step in creating cult status is to, “clearly define your purpose and communicate it to as many people as possible.” What is new, is that defining a brand's purpose starts with thinking about the impact the brand wants to have on the people it serves. To me this nicely extends to the impact it has on society and the environment.  

This approach complements Simon Sinek’s ‘Start with Why’ approach by providing a way of measuring the impact of your brand’s purpose, something that any CMO focused on ROI will welcome. It’s about re-thinking the impact you want to have as a business, so in the long run your business has the best chance of appealing to the greatest number of customers. It’s about questioning, clarifying and proving why you do what you do, because businesses that exist with the sole reason of creating shareholder returns have no role in tomorrow’s world.

Creating an impact statement

If you want to create your own impact statement, start by taking your purpose or mission statement and adding the words “so that….” after it. 

Rather than saying: 

‘Our mission is to become the go-to provider for XYZ, serving 40% of the renewable energy market by 2025’.

Instead say:

‘Our mission is to become the go to provider for XYZ, helping 10 million people make the switch to renewable energy, so that we can directly reduce our carbon emissions by X million tonnes by 2025.

A new addition to brand architecture

Impact statements are a welcome addition to the brand architecture model we’re adopting at 3rdsapce. We already help brands big and small create their purpose and bring it to life via a content mission – using consumer insight to connect a brand’s purpose with the values of purpose-driven consumers. 

By adding an impact statement to the brand architecture, we’ll provide a measurable way to demonstrate the ROI of purpose and provide a compelling message for consumers to elevate your brand to cult status.  


 

3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help

Susan Burchill, 3rdspace senior writer and Rachael Sullivan, consumer behavioural specialist uncover key insights for understanding and engaging with Generation Z. 

As the EY Megatrends Report 2020 notes, referring to Generation Z, “The next decade will be shaped by the maturation of the largest generational cohort in history.” This cohort of people aged 10 to 24 years old comprises 1.8 billion people, which makes up 24% of the global population.

The most diverse generation yet

As populations of the world’s leading economies become more elderly, developing-market societies have growing numbers of youths, leading to the fragmentation of population distribution across different nations. According to the Megatrends report, “India stands out with a population that includes 375 million people — 27% of which are Gen Z.” By contrast, Gen Z in Japan makes up just 14% of the population. 

The Gen Z mindset on social issues can differ across geographies as well, with those in developing markets more socially conservative, as an example. “Companies will have to identify the important distinctions among Gen Zers to serve this global cohort effectively,” the report says.

Gen Z globally are united by one common purpose

Diverse as they are between countries, one of the core commonalities that unites Gen Z across the globe is their commitment to tackling sustainability. Gen Z’s fear of climate change is well-founded, with the EY Megatrends Report pointing out that nearly 60% of the Gen Z population lives in countries with a high vulnerability to climate change but low readiness for responding to it. This serves to intensify climate’s impact on this generation. 

And in the top 20 Gen Z countries with coastlines, 121 million people currently live in areas that will be below high tide by 2050, while 252 million will be subject to coastal flooding by the same date.

This is likely the greatest contributor to Gen Z’s preference for buying products from manufacturers who protect the environment and have a sustainable supply chain. While Millennials made changes in their everyday lives to be more sustainable, Gen Z is taking global action. According to Parrys Raines, Senior Consultant, Climate Change and Sustainability Services, EY Australia, “Gen Z are the ones creating a movement to address the climate emergency by engaging with businesses and governments at the highest echelons.”

An insight into the mindset of Gen Z consumers

The Gen Z mindset is both a product of, and different to, every generation that has preceded it. As Parrys Raines says, “Young people in Generation Z are purpose driven, solutions focused, digitally connected, collaborative, and have a sense of urgency about issues that matter for the future.”

Appealing to Gen Z starts with ensuring a brand’s purpose is at the heart of the entire business and that leaders take ownership and responsibility for the impact this has on society and the planet. The next challenge is to pivot rather than disrupt to create cut-through. 

As the world’s population makeup changes, marketers need to re-invent their approach by leading from the middle. This requires brands to adopt an impact statement and develop purpose-driven brand campaigns that purpose-driven consumers can identify with, and act on, in alignment with their own beliefs. 

Unlike previous generations, Gen Z do not see consumption as a means to an end. They see it as a reflection of who they are and the impact they want to see. For brands to become trusted in the eyes of the next generation, they must connect with the values of Gen Z using content that promotes positive action.


 

3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help

 

3rd Space's Rachael Sullivan consumer behavioural specialist, explains why now is the time to revisit and reconsider your brand's purpose

Sir David Attenborough is one of the few public figures who has true inter-generational appeal, from baby boomers to Gen Z. While older fans have admired him since his earliest TV appearances, Attenborough’s unwavering commitment to preserving the natural world has also cemented him as an unlikely hero in the hearts and minds of young people. His latest documentary film, A Life On Our Planet, is described as his “Witness Statement” and a “Vision for the Future”. If you haven’t watched A Life On Our Planet, stop reading, grab your remote and watch it on Netflix now. Yes, it is distressing viewing. At times I felt ashamed to call myself a member of the human race. Yet it also conveys the right amount of hope. He reassures us that it is still possible to undo some of the damage we have inflicted on this planet - if we act now.

 

Marketing, advertising and owning my responsibility in the climate emergency. 

As the climate emergency becomes more pressing, I have started to feel less and less okay about some of the work I have done. In a marketing and advertising career spanning over 15 years I’ve worked on brand and marketing campaigns for airlines, news corporations, telcos and retailers on hundreds of briefs with objectives that went something along the lines of, “launch new product X or sell more product Y”. 

It’s not that I haven’t worked on incredible brands – I have. It’s not that I haven’t worked on really worthwhile foundation- or charity-based briefs – I’ve done that too. It’s more a feeling that, the older I get and now, as a parent myself, I realise that what I do for a living is part of a wider ecology.  

I’m opening up to, instead of shutting out, the realisation that the industry we operate in looks at briefs and projects in silo. Partly because creative people move around so much, also because the division of labour has meant the work we do is fragmented - removed from manufacturing and distribution processes. As bottom lines are squeezed, we are already consumed and consuming what’s next instead of assessing the true impact of the work we have done and the impact it has had beyond sales figures.

 

It’s time to re-visit your brand’s purpose 

As leaders across the world grapple with navigating uncertainty post COVID-19, CMOs and brand marketers are also handed a rare opportunity to reset. As companies look down the barrel of declining sales, the benefit-risk trade-off swings in the favour of purpose-driven marketing, providing a pause to think about what might be possible if we put planet before profit.

If your brand’s purpose statement was written more than a year ago, the chances are it needs a re-visit to ensure it resonates with today’s purpose-driven consumers.

Generation Z are demanding it

The latest EY Megatrends data tells us, “the next decade will be shaped by the maturation of the largest generational cohort in history — Generation Z. This cohort of people between 10- and 24-year olds comprises 1.8 billion people, making up 24% of the global population.” 

Gen Z (and the subsequent Generation Alpha) are the first generations to be born into a world where the impacts of climate change were happening around them. Many Gen Zs believe that business must play a key role in addressing the most pressing global issues, particularly climate change. Gen Zs want to buy products from manufacturers who protect the environment and have a sustainable supply chain.

 

As a collective of advertising, branding and marketing professionals we must take responsibility and show accountability.

The Gen Z mindset is both a product of, and different to every generation before. They are driven by sense of purpose, focused on solutions, digitally connected, collaborative, and are certainly not afraid of acting with a sense of urgency on issues impacting our future. 

Appealing to Gen Zs starts with ensuring a brand’s purpose is at the heart of the entire business and that leaders take ownership and responsibility for the impact this has on society and the planet. The next challenge is to cut through the deafening marketing noise to communicate with and connect with the values of Gen Zs, using content that promotes action. 

 

Brands must transform on purpose 

This change must come hand in hand with purpose – a brand’s witness statement to the world. Sir David Attenborough demonstrates that the rate of change to our biodiversity and planet over our lifetimes is unprecedented. Today it’s not enough for brands to adapt, they must reinvent frequently, to change our trajectory as a species and in doing so, ensure the course of a brand’s survival.

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3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help

3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. Our Brands with Purpose e-book will help you understand what makes a great content strategy, how to audit your current content strategy and how to set clear business goals to ensure your content lives and breathes your purpose. Our Brands with Purpose e-book is your first step to understanding the Why, How and What of your content strategy.


 

If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help.

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Simon Sinek inspired audiences across the world with 2017 with his sell-out Start With Why Leadership Forum. In 2020, he returned to Australia with a new book and seminar tour: Simon Sinek: LIVE. Lucky enough to be in the audience, 3rdspace’s Rachel Sullivan has broken down her Top Takeouts from Simon Sinek: Live  to help inspire you to think about your company’s purpose and how to create content that provokes action.

 

Communicating your company’s purpose is as important as advancing a just cause 

If it’s got you thinking about advancing your company’s just cause, we’d urge you not to forget the importance of communicating and demonstrating your organisations purpose – the reason you exist beyond making money. This must be done frequently and authentically to employees and your customers so they continue to engage and promote your brand for days, weeks and years to come. We loved Simon’s notion that you wouldn’t tell your spouse you love them on your wedding day and not say it again, yet many companies take the same approach when it comes to communicating their purpose. 

 

Is it time to re-visit your brands purpose?

Attending events like Simon Sinek’s - The Infinite Game are brilliant for taking us out of our current perspective. In explaining that leaders today need to be existentially flexible - willing to make 180° turn in order to advance the organisations just cause. We got thinking about what this means for CMO and brand markets to stay relevant to consumers in an increasingly complex world where consumers are demanding more transparency. 

As we navigate uncertainly in a post COVID-19 world, CMO’s and brand marketers are handed a rare opportunity to reset as the benefit-risk trade off swings in the favour of purpose driven marketing. The key take out is to pause to think about what might be possible if we truly put Simon Sinek’s concept of advancing a just cause before profit.

 

Connecting with a new generation of purpose driven consumers 

Appealing to Gen Z’s starts with ensuring a brands purpose is at the heart of the entire business and that leaders take ownership and responsibility for the impact this has on society and the planet. This group are active in pressuring business to do and be better pushing companies to talk in terms of triple bottom lines. 

 

How brands with purpose can create content that promotes action

Today it’s not enough for brands to adapt, they must re-invent frequently, to adopt an infinite mindset to ensure our survival as a humanity, thus creating an environment in which brands can thrive. It’s not about telling customers what your purpose is. It’s about finding the stories within your business that demonstrates it.

By building a content strategy underpinned by communication pillars that demonstrate and reinforce this purpose every day. We call this your content mission.  A content mission then informs the creation of engaging content designed to provoke action - from your employees, customers and potential customers. 

If your origination has a just cause or purpose statement but doesn’t have a content mission that align to it, chances are you are missing an huge opportunity to better connect with the values of your customers.  

 


 

3rdspace is a content marketing company whose purpose is to help purpose driven brands connect with the values of purpose driven consumers. If you’d like to chat about how your content marketing can better connect with your consumers by finding the place of shared purpose our team of marketing & content strategist, behavioural psychologists and creatives are here to help

If you’ve been in the sphere of marketing, content or digital in recent years you will  probably be familiar with Hub, Hero & Hygiene, the Google framework originally created for YouTube publishers for creating content. The framework has been adapted more broadly to be used in the  seo & digital agency world and is often used to help marketers ensure that they address the need for different kinds of content to build channel subscribers, website views, and improve SEO rankings.

At 3rdspace, we have  our own model- Hum, Sing Shout. While there are some similarities in approach to Google’s framework, the 3rdspace model is centred around brand building, rather than SEO or digital metrics.

So our component parts are a little different, for example Hum represents  your always on content that speaks to your brand purpose. This content needs to be helpful and/or useful, hopefully both. Often focused in digital channels, this content needs to be consistently created, ensuring a regular stream of quality communication with, rather than at, your target audience.

Sing content is for campaigns that specifically answer your audience needs and questions and build upon your brand’s point of difference, where there is clear space away from competitors. This is where thought leadership content, primary research, and similar content comes into its own, the kind  that helps move a consumer through the purchase cycle. This content is often shared across channels, and drives earned media through  PR, hard copy publications and third party publishing platforms.

Shout content, as the name suggests, is focused on larger campaigns, high profile content that inspires your audience to action. This type of content takes many forms , from experiential events to multimedia formats. Importantly, the key metric across all these types of content is engagement, the primary purpose of any content is to build long term sustainable relationships with your audience,

2020 has been the year of the hum, sing. Brands have been focused on their purpose, their expertise, their point of difference, and how they can authentically help their customers, particularly through the difficult times we’ve encountered recently.

There has been a shift away from big campaigns, noisy activity from chest beating brands. Through the pandemic, consumers have looked for authenticity, and strong brands who are clear on their purpose, continue to be the big winners.

For all of us in the marketing, media and advertising world, 2020 has been incredibly challenging. Most large network agencies have taken a hit with a decline in ad spend, many large brands have pulled traditional advertising budgets, and a swathe of marketers have been made redundant as a result. The dominant narrative for 2020 marketing has been gloomy.

But there have been surprising upsides. While big brands have pulled large scale budgets, for big-ticket ad campaigns, TV and media buy, one area of marketing that has been quietly thriving is content. And to be clear about the much-bandied term ‘content’, I mean the communications a brand creates about themselves- typically anything from website content to articles, blog posts, video and social content through to things like events.

I’ve come across at least a dozen brands this year who are growing rapidly - they’ve hired marketers to grow their content, expanded their content budgets or invested in it for the first time. So is there a correlation between the effects of a pandemic on traditional ad spend and the rise in content? We think it's there, and here’s why.

Your Brand Is Always On- Pandemic or Not

The beauty of content is that it’s about your owned channels. Your website, your socials, every communication that comes from your brand.  It’s all about your purpose and point of difference. Every brand needs regular, consistent communications to engage its customers, using content that builds long term sustainable relationships. So, content is a bit like a stealth marketer, quietly seeding good, helpful, useful content on your channels for your customers to find you whenever they need it. 

Content is Cost Effective When Budgets Are Tight.

Like any marketing expense, content can be expensive, but it doesn’t have to be.

In fact, content created for your owned channels can be your most cost-effective. You don’t need sophisticated design or complex conversation, but you do need to be clear on your purpose and your positioning, and your content does need to be consistently created.

Most importantly, it needs to be good quality, and match your purpose and proposition.

Content Builds Your Brand, Day In, Day Out.

When you focus on filling your owned channels with consistently good and useful content for your customers, you’re growing your own brand like a garden. It takes time, and you need to give it quality care, but with time and effort, you will create a brand that thrives, with a deeply and sustainably engaged audience, aligned to your brand purpose.

In these challenging times it’s essential that our number one priority remains the safety of our society and also connectivity with citizens and our customers. 

As the stats grow by the day, we are likely to see something similar to the seven stages of grieving – but as an entire population. Shock and denial will be followed by fear and anger, then into depression and loneliness, before moving into the upwards turn.

We know that the way forward is through, and that brands play a vital part by living their purpose and finding new ways to engage, inform and help people through the period of isolation. By leveraging content that involves and gives the audience a release from the continuous bad news feed, brands have a real opportunity to cut through to their audiences. 

We’ve invested in a range of software and licenses to create captivating content remotely. We’ve upgraded our podcast studio to be all remote, and brought on more resources creatively and editorially that can scale to 24/7 operation, with creatives and writers in the UK and NYC working with our Sydney team and our new remote film and live stream studio.

Our Virtual Studio allows us to use all methods of content capture, from desktop and phone cameras, through to high end 4k and 8k cameras and quality audio from remote locations, all whilst having the potential to feed in multiple angles and real-time vision switching.  

We’ve taken what is a B2B conferencing back end, and given it a turbo charged capacity adding in the ability to generate: 

This capability taps into the new normal allowing brands to create content for their owned platforms and to go live on any social platform.

The content needs to have the consumer at the heart, reflect that we understand the situation and involve them in real time interactive content.

We’re on a mission to utilise this new “3rdspace” where brands and consumers can come together on screen as we feed the audience into the content mix from their homes with the talent.

While it is a very scary time, it’s also an opportunity to innovate with content that can range from learning and dialogue shaping interactive debate to live music, comedy, cooking and game shows.

If you’d like to know more call Rob in his remote office on 0419 722 151 or drop us a note;
rob@3rdspace.com.au
Madeleine.l@3rdspace.com.au

Stay safe,
Rob and the 3rdspace Team

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